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June 11, 2006

Hello, old friend. I've missed you.

Guess who's back?!?

(I'm a low-tech knitter - a crumpled up pattern photocopy and post-it remnant is all I need)

Mountainash!

Wow, I haven't touched this project in more than a month! And you've noticed ;) - I'd say at least once a week someone would mention Mr. MA in a comment or e-mail. He appreciates your concern for his apparent disappearance :).

Reasons? There are two. First, other projects just took precedence, I guess - during my Mountainash hiatus, I started and finished the Pentagon Sweater, and the little raglan for LL. I'm also knitting away on the Egyptian dress for Annie, with a goal of finishing it by the end of the month! I just need to get some of those needles with the motors, you know? So I can knit 500 stitches a minute... from the In Your Dreams store :).

The second reason has to do with Mountainash himself. I got totally trapped in the section highlighted pink below:

It is, without a doubt, the easiest section of the entire pattern. The right-side rows have a few yarnovers and decreases, the wrong-side rows are all purl. And I simply got bored out of my mind! I could hardly convince myself to complete one row in one sitting. Knit 10 stitches, yawn... knit 10 more, yawn... knit 10 more, alright, I've had enough!

But I had to take a break from the Egyptian dress over the last few days, and I pushed myself to get past it. It took me a few seconds to find my place in the pattern, but the general flow of the thing has been ingrained in my head, so I was back on track in no time. I'm poised to begin the next section (highlighted blue above), and you can see it's a little tricky.

It's showtime!!! (rubs hands in anticipation, smacks lips with delight, laughs maniacally!) Who's ready for some Mountainash action?!?

Oh, the progress schematic. I haven't forgotten ;)

Slowly, but surely, I'm closing in on the center.

Posted by Kathy on June 11, 2006 10:18 PM

Comments

Go'on girl...and hey, congrats on being an Amazing Lace finalist!

Can I just say that I LOVE your blog??? The wit, sarcasm and humor is just sublime.....

Got 'trapped' in the easiest section? That's our Grumperina, no doubt :)!

But that was prime TV knitting! Or book reading, or guild meeting, or what have you. When the knitting is simple it's time to multitask!

So what are your conditions when you knit?

Hey! At one point you said that you had to switch to smaller needles for part of this, and they didn't come in the brand (point sharpness) you wanted----

Why not go to Home Depot, grab some small dowel rods, and sharpen them yourself? Or maybe they can do that at the store? Just an idea...

Kathy, that MountainAsh will look great in pink! :) I am primed to make another Tivoli this summer (camping knitting?) but want to make long sleeves... or at least 3/4. I'm making it in a wool blend. Any suggestions for the sleeves? Or just pop sleeve stitches onto holders and work my way down?

Kathy, congratulations on MA. It looks great. Good going. You just have to break from these things sometimes. I always follow your work and it is just so very interesting and fun. Thanks ever so.

I can't believe how much progress you've made!

I noticed that on your pattern chart you have a torn post-it note. I have only ever (unsuccessfully) knit with a pattern chart once before. I frogged the project in the end, and then realised that post-it notes might be the answer.

I was wondering, if you were so inclined and had the time, would you fancy writing a tutuorial on how to read a pattern chart? Every online tutorial I've seen so far hasn't succeeded in teaching me...

sharon
x

ha! i am so with you on the "ho hum boring" part. I have to chug through sections like that, typically with a book or movie, so I can zone out. :)

You are making amazing progress on MA! :)

Welcome back, Mr. MA!

Glad to see Mountainash back!

I almost always watch TV when I knit lace. A section like the pink is perfect for things I haven't seen before, so I can pay more attention to the show. Trickier sections require more familiar programs.

And I have to say I love the way you show the schematics of where you are in a project; it's a great visual reference.

Oh. Mr. MA, you have been missed, but all the other distractions were so interesting and fun, it was hard to realize it had been a month. The next part looks fun. Googly mooglies ahoy!

Oh, hooray! I have missed you and your progress schematic, Mr. Mountainash!

Only you would get bored with a simple section after the craziness that came before! Or maybe you were just dragging your feet so you didn't have to start the next scary section ;-) Ok, I know that isn't how you operate. Mountainash is still gorgeous and I can't believe how much progress you've made.

So lovely!

Mr. MA's really coming along! Great work!

Say, do you happen to know of any place in the US where you could buy Mountain Ash, or the book he comes from? I've looked all over the english sites, and can't seem to find it.

Okay, I have to ask - how do you get the over-the-shoulder picture? Is there a secret photographer in your life? Do you have a third hand? Is your cat particularly talented? Or did you go to the trouble of setting up a complicated tripod/timer shot for that? Whatever the answer, I'm impressed!

Beautiful!

It's great to see MA back. What is that odd stripe on your wrist?

I got the book that our dear Mountain Ash is in. Along with another Japanese knitting book reccomended on the site (Yesasia is wonderful! When I was in Japan for five years I used Amazon.com to stay in touch with the states. Now that I'm back and "homesick" this site does just the same!) You've trapped me into two favorites: knitting and the Japanese language. I get to knit all this great stuff, but I get to translate it first! THAT is knitting geek!

Thank you!

I also bought the book on YesAsia.com. Buying the book is the easy part!

I knit the sweater from the cover. Picture on our knitblog.

I checked out a book from the library to help interpret the "katakana" characters which isn't too hard. Also used Microsoft's Japanese keyboard feature in Word to type in a few of the parts I really needed to know and pasted that text into Babelfish for a translation. Once you know the rules of Japanese chart reading they are almost all you need. Japanese charts are awesome! I wish our English patterns were charted like that.

That's such a lovely pattern - I'm glad you're back to it, if only because I (selfishly) can't wait to see how it blocks out.

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